coverspy:

Inkheart, Cornelia Funke (F, 20s, wearing workout gear, grocery bags, eating a slice of white bread straight out of the bag, F train)

I wish that I had had the space on coverspy to talk about how amazing and weird this moment was. This girl was really into reading this book, so much so that she was kind of oblivious to the people around her to the point of not realizing that her bags were in the way, and so on. At one point, while keeping her eyes on the page, she rummaged around in a grocery bag with one hand, pulled out a single slice out white bread and put it in her mouth and just ate it slowly without the assistance of her other hand, which was needed for other important duties such as holding onto the rail and turning the page. 
It was bizarre and lovely. She was so clearly rapt by the story that she did not care about anything else happening on the train, and I wouldn’t be surprised if she later missed her stop.

coverspy:

Inkheart, Cornelia Funke (F, 20s, wearing workout gear, grocery bags, eating a slice of white bread straight out of the bag, F train)

I wish that I had had the space on coverspy to talk about how amazing and weird this moment was. This girl was really into reading this book, so much so that she was kind of oblivious to the people around her to the point of not realizing that her bags were in the way, and so on. At one point, while keeping her eyes on the page, she rummaged around in a grocery bag with one hand, pulled out a single slice out white bread and put it in her mouth and just ate it slowly without the assistance of her other hand, which was needed for other important duties such as holding onto the rail and turning the page. 

It was bizarre and lovely. She was so clearly rapt by the story that she did not care about anything else happening on the train, and I wouldn’t be surprised if she later missed her stop.

lastnightsreading:

Emma Straub at McNally-Jackson, 7/23/14

lastnightsreading:

Emma Straub at McNally-Jackson, 7/23/14

coverspy:

A History of American Literature 1607-1765, Moses Coit Tylor (M, 30s, white shirt, grey pants, glasses, JSQ Path)

coverspy:

A History of American Literature 1607-1765, Moses Coit Tylor (M, 30s, white shirt, grey pants, glasses, JSQ Path)

  • Jack Antonoff: New Jersey is a wonderful place specifically because of its proximity to the greatest city in the world. And that's why it's so special. Everyone from New Jersey always feels like they're looking into the window of the party.
  • Marc Maron: Right. But you can leave the party. Unlike people who are stuck at the party forever.
bookandbeer:

Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger with Summer Slam Pale Ale, a Founders Pale Ale Clone homebrew

Oh hey! This is my book! And my homebrew! And my kitchen table!

bookandbeer:

Her Fearful Symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger with Summer Slam Pale Ale, a Founders Pale Ale Clone homebrew

Oh hey! This is my book! And my homebrew! And my kitchen table!

What are you even doing if you haven’t listened to this yet?

johndarnielle:

giraffepoliceforce:

Still pretty proud of my response to this.

I loved Marvel comics when I was a kid; I was a weird kid who didn’t get down with macho stuff, in part because of the general scene in my house & in part because I was scrawny and couldn’t really front like I was tough. In my tiny limited-to-my-personal-friends-and-surroundings comics scene, the idea that macho norm-enforcer types could be into comics would have come as a huge and deeply disappointing surprise; comics, in my mind, were for people who’d already begun to sense that, in the immortal words of Anti-Flag, “their system doesn’t work for you.”
I hope Marvel systematically “ruins” absolutely every one of their legacy characters forever, one after another, and then D.C. runs a Sgt. Rock miniseries where he renounces violence as a means of conflict resolution. May the grousing of the macho comics dudes ascend to Heaven forever and make an acceptable sacrifice unto Galactus

johndarnielle:

giraffepoliceforce:

Still pretty proud of my response to this.

I loved Marvel comics when I was a kid; I was a weird kid who didn’t get down with macho stuff, in part because of the general scene in my house & in part because I was scrawny and couldn’t really front like I was tough. In my tiny limited-to-my-personal-friends-and-surroundings comics scene, the idea that macho norm-enforcer types could be into comics would have come as a huge and deeply disappointing surprise; comics, in my mind, were for people who’d already begun to sense that, in the immortal words of Anti-Flag, “their system doesn’t work for you.”

I hope Marvel systematically “ruins” absolutely every one of their legacy characters forever, one after another, and then D.C. runs a Sgt. Rock miniseries where he renounces violence as a means of conflict resolution. May the grousing of the macho comics dudes ascend to Heaven forever and make an acceptable sacrifice unto Galactus

submission

thatenglishmajorquestion:

"what are you going to do with a degree in english?" I came out to have a good time and I honestly feel so attacked right now 

Curiosities of a reader, feminist, lady of publishing, coverspy agent, writer and editor for Publishing Trendsetter, and lover of the Midwest.

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